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Salmonella

Molecular Biology and Pathogenesis

Edition:
1st
Author(s):
ISBN:
9781904933267
Format:
Hardback
Publication Date:
January 18, 2007
Content Details:
460 pages
Language:
English

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List Price:   $225.00

  
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  • About the Book

    Book Summary

    The recent completion of the genome sequences of several Salmonella serovars, allied with the application of whole genome analyses, and the availability of meaningful infection models in target animal species have contributed greatly to recent progress in the understanding of the molecular genomics and cellular biology of this family of complex pathogens.

    In this book internationally acclaimed experts review cutting-edge topics in Salmonella research. Chapters are written from a molecular perspective and provide a unique insight into the current status of Salmonella research. Topics include epidemiology, molecular typing, antibiotic resistance, host-interaction in the gut, adhesins, pathogenecity islands, virulence plasmids, gene regulation, biofilms, and microarray analysis.

    Features

    • Salmonella is responsible for an estimated 3 billion human infections per year.
    • Several Salmonella genome sequences have been completed recently so this book on the molecular biology of Salmonella is particularly well timed.
    • There is a focus on the current and most topical aspects of Salmonella research.
  • Contents

    1. Current Trends in the Spread and Occurrence of Human Salmonellosis: Molecular Typing and Emerging Antibiotic Resistance 2. The Intestinal Phase of Salmonella Infections 3. Adhesins of Salmonella and Their Putative Roles in Infection 4. Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands 5. The Salmonella enterica Virulence Plasmid and the spv Gene Cluster 6. Virulence Gene Regulation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium 7. Biofilms of Salmonella enterica 8. Innate Host Defenses in Salmonellosis 9. Revealing the Mosaic Nature of Salmonella Genomes Using Microarrays